starting to finish…..

I’m starting the finishing process on my Rabbit and Sheep Greetings make do, so I thought I’d share some of the details because “turning” a punched piece can be quite a challenge.  Here goes:OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above is the finished punched piece.  I’ll be sharing the pattern with you as soon as I find a blank piece of paper and a sharpie.  (how is it possible that there is not ONE unused piece of printer paper in this house?)

After I finish the punching and aging, it’s time to find a backing fabric and pins.

a bit of ticking and some long pins

a bit of ticking and some long pins

Now, place right sides of the punched piece and the backing fabric together….

two rights will make a right!

two rights will make a right!

Here’s the part that makes the world of difference for me.  I make a fold in the backing fabric over the narrowest part of the punched piece.  In this case, the fold goes vertically along the rabbit’s ear….

see the fold?

see the fold?

Then, I take that fold and fold it over itself, again, so it’s a very narrow little roll….

a roll of backing

a roll of backing

(the above picture is not of the rabbits ear, but the roll concept is the same.) This little roll of backing fabric won’t, hopefully, get caught in my sewing machine needle.  Now, I pin that roll to the punched piece…

pinned and ready to stitch

pinned and ready to stitch

Having this little roll of extra backing fabric, after everything is stitched together, makes turning so much easier.

Now to stitch ~ be careful NOT to stitch the roll itself….

stitching

stitching

In the above, you can see that I stitched around the piece twice. (I don’t usually use white thread, but I wanted it to be visible to the camera so you could see the stitches.)  That’s because I put a LOT of stress on the piece as I turn it right side out and I don’t want any seams bursting.   You can also see that I’ve snipped the edges all the way around the perimeter, except by the sheep’s belly, where I haven’t stitched at all.  The belly is where I’ll turn the whole thing right side out.

Now unpin the roll…

roll unrolled

roll unrolled

See how much room there is, now, for turning?

Turn….OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

That’s actually the rabbit’s arm I’m turning in the above photo.  Even with the extra backing fabric, turning is still challenging….OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

…but much easier!

ta da!

ta da!

Now everything’s turned and ready for stuffing.  You may notice in the above that the ends of the sheep’s legs are not stitched closed.  That’s because I want to put wood dowels inside the legs to anchor the stuffed piece to the rocker or whatever I decide to use as a base.

I’ll share the pattern with you, if you’re interested, as soon as I get some paper…. maybe next week?

 

In the meantime, have a blissful weekend!

 

rebecca

 

little thief finish…

 

little thief

Little Thief is punched and aged and ready to be stuffed.  I stitched the wool I chose for the backing all the way around the punch needle, then cut a slit in the back for turning.

ready for stuffing

I like the way the colors in this piece of wool echo the colors of perle cotton in the punch needle.  I’ve had this wool for several years.  It had started out as a camel color plaid before I dyed it this soft orange.  I haven’t known what to do with it until now ~ Serendipity, for sure!

crushed balsam smells heavenly!

I decided to use crushed balsam and snips for stuffing.

stuffed and stitched

After stuffing and stitching the opening closed, I’m ready to add the “pocket” that will slide over the tin pin cushion holder.

i love this part!

Adding the beaded edging takes time, yes, but I absolutely love the process.  There’s something very soothing about beading, and the addition of these little loops makes a big impact.  They really finish this piece!

I used vintage glass beads which I found online.  New beads, or plastic beads, would have been less expensive, just as using only snips or only fiberfill would have been less costly for the stuffing.  But, for me, using quality vintage things, like these glass beads, or using balsam for stuffing as well as snips adds to my enjoyment and I always do a better job when I enjoy the process!

all done!

Here’s Little Thief in his final glory.I just love the tin pin cushion holder!  I added a vintage wood spool with black thread as a finishing touch.I’m so glad Lori Brechlin came up with this fabulously prim design, and that Ali Strebel offers these wonderful tin holders!If you would like to visit Little Thief on Lori’s blog ~ Not forgotten farm ~ click here

If you would like ordering information for the tin pincushion base available through Ali Strebel ~ click here

 

Until next time, live Simple!

 

rebecca